Bottom line

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Organisations (and organisms) evolve in response to changes in their environment, such as changes in supply or demand of resources and materials and changes in knowledge, but an important factor determining the nature of change that takes place in an organisation depends on how it assesses the benefit of options available to it in terms of changes to its behaviours that it could choose to accept or reject.

This "measuring stick" that determines what's beneficial and what isn't, and how beneficial or damaging something is, often gets referred to as the bottom line, and is the ultimate determinant of which concepts survive. The most common bottom line we see in our civilisation today is the economic bottom line, which means that most decision-making processes are benefiting the planet only indirectly, if at all. The Organic Design system is instead based on the bottom line of harmony.

Unification: Unification is one of the values of OrganicDesign (the Platform specification includes a process of alignment with it). It is the foundation direction of all Platforms (trust groups that operate according to a system that is aligned with the OrganicDesign charter). It is the fundamental "default project" that essentially sums up the process of alignment itself, and could be thought of as "alignment with alignment". [more]


Economic bottom line

Organisations (and organisms) evolve in response to changes in their environment. Some examples are changes in supply or demand of resources and materials, and changes in knowledge. An important factor determining the nature of change that takes place in an organisation depends on how it assesses the benefit of options available to it in terms of changes to behaviours it could choose to accept or reject.

Most of the global problems we're faced with today as a species and as a planetary organism are due to the bottom line being financial, rather than being based on the well-being of the inhabitants. The former is related to egoism, greed, selfishness and fragmentation, the latter to unification and the other spiritual values.

Triple bottom line

The triple bottom line is also known as "people, planet, profit" or "the three pillars" captures an expanded spectrum of values and criteria for measuring organisational (and societal) success: economic, ecological and social. With the ratification of the United Nations and ICLEI triple bottom line standard for urban and community accounting in early 2007, this became the dominant approach to full cost accounting in public sector. Similar UN standards apply to natural capital and human capital measurement to assist in measurements required by the triple bottom line, for example the ecoBudget standard for reporting ecological footprint.

See also

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